Monday, April 26, 2010

A Peek at the Creative Space of Julie Paschkis


This Monday we're getting a peek at the workspace of illustrator Julie Paschkis.  Julie's work has already made an appearance in this interview series because she illustrated Rachel Rodriguez's picture books Through Georgia's Eyes and Building on Nature.

Julie's 26th picture book collaboration, Summer Birds: The Butterflies of Maria Merian written by Margarita Engle, will be published this week. Summer Birds is a picture book biography about Maria Sibylla Merian, a 17th-century naturalist who carefully observed the metamorphosis of the butterfly and documented it through her paintings to disprove centuries of scientific belief that butterflies were creatures of the devil and originated from mud. Booklist gave it a starred review and said "Joyous and inspiring, this beautiful introduction to a passionate young scientist who defied grown-ups and changed history will spark children’s own fascination with the natural world and its everyday dramas."

Julie has also illustrated two beautiful books of poems by Julie Larios, The Yellow Elephant and Imaginary Menagerie. (The Yellow Elephant coined the phrase "red donkey tantrum" that I think would be very satisfying to use in everyday conversation. I imagine the context something like this: "Throw a red donkey tantrum if you want, but I'm not putting the Mallomars in the shopping cart.") She illustrated Night of the Moon: A Muslim Holiday Story by Hena Khan about celebrating the month of Ramadan. Several of her picture books were written by her sister, Janet Lord, including Albert the Fix-it Man, Here Comes Grandma!, and Where is Catkin? And one of my personal favorites of her illustrated books is Mrs. Chicken and the Hungry Crocodile, written by Won-Ldy Paye and Margaret H. Lippert, which was a Charlotte Zolotow Award Honor Book.

Julie is a former elementary school art teacher who now works full-time painting, creating commercial illustrations, and illustrating children's books. She also has designed a beautiful line of fabrics called In the Beginning Folklorica.

Visit her website to learn more about Julie Paschkis and her work.



 Describe your workspace.

I have a studio in my house. The rest of the house is one story but my studio is upstairs. It is about 15 feet square. I have a table to paint on and a table for overflow projects, a computer corner, and lots of books and supplies. I have a big window looking into the yard and little windows where I can see the mountains in the winter and trees in the summer.



When I am in the thick of a project my studio gets overwhelmingly messy. When I finish a book or another big project I usually take time to shovel out. I would like to have more space but I would probably fill that up too.

 My dog Lily.

Describe a typical workday.

I get up early. The hours before breakfast are the most productive because I am uninterrupted then. I don’t work for eight straight hours. I take breaks for walking the dog, yoga, bicycling, starting some soup etc. I generally work for several 2-3 hour chunks in a day. I work every day.

What media do you use and which is your favorite?

Usually I paint with ink and gouache. I like to experiment with different media too such as cut paper. I scan my finished art into the computer but I create the art by hand. I need to use my hands as well as my mind. I have ideas in my head but they never come clear until I am actually drawing.


List three of your most favorite things in your workspace and why they are meaningful.

My studio is overflowing with things. I can’t pick out three! Here are some of the things in my studio.

A mug made by Marcia Paschkis, my mother.

Pencil collection in my studio.

Photo of my grandmother reading Beatrix Potter @ 1950. She watches over me.

More stuff. . .

Do you have any rituals in your work habits? If so, describe them.

My habit is to always paint. That is what I love to do. I paint for books, I paint fabric designs and I paint paintings.

My cat, Clementine, on the paintings for a new book. Bad kitty!


What do you listen to while you work?

I need silence when I’m coming up with an idea. While I’m in the middle of a painting I often listen to music or to stories.

What is your drink and/or snack of choice while you’re working.

I always have a cup of tea in my studio. My mother is a potter and I have lots of mugs that she made; I drink out of one of them. I don’t bring food up here.


What keeps you focused while you’re working?

The work talks back to me and keeps it interesting.

 What aspect of illustrating do you find most challenging and why?

A book is a long project. It can be scary to get started. And then when I’m about 2/3 of the way through I am often struck with doubt about the overall direction that I have taken.

 If you were forced to share your workspace but could share it with anyone of your choosing, who would it be?

My life changed when I got my own workspace; Virginia Woolf knew. I hope I never have to share it.

What is the best piece of illustrating advice you’ve heard or received?

“Take other people’s vegetables but make your own soup.” (told to me by Keith Baker, possibly originally by Sendak.)

Monday, April 19, 2010

A Peek at the Creative Space of Stephen Emond

Happy Monday, everyone! This Monday we’re stepping inside the creative space of author and illustrator Stephen Emond. Steve’s debut young adult novel, Happyface, was published in March by Little, Brown and Company. Have you heard about Happyface yet? I just finished it this weekend and thought it was so, so good. I’m not alone on that opinion either--the novel has received a starred review from both Publisher’s Weekly and Kirkus, and has blurbs of approval on the back cover by authors Scott Westerfeld, Adam Rex, Michael Buckley, and Hope Larson. Happyface is told through the journal of an artistic, shy, funny teenager. His writing and drawings combine to narrate the events of his sophomore year which begins with him pining for a girl, worrying about his parents arguing, and wishing he was more like his older brother until about 30 pages in, on a nearly blank page, all he writes is: “Today is the day the world changed, and that is all I will say because I don’t ever want to think of it again.” The story shifts completely from there--the art, the tone, the character’s circumstances--as the narrator resolves to put on a happy face and adopt a new persona to push himself past the painful events that have happened which are slowly revealed throughout the book. I thought Adam Rex’s blurb completely summed up my reaction to the book as well. He wrote: “Emond will put a smile on your face. Then a grimace, another smile, a wince, two more smiles, sort of a horrified stare. . . . He’s written a funny, honest, at times painfully familiar book.”

You can read a fun Beyond the Book account by Steve’s editor Connie Hsu about Happyface’s acquisition and development at the Blue Rose Girls’ blog.

Prior to breaking into the young adult literary world, Steve created the comic Emo Boy of which he wrote 12 issues, published by SLG Publishing. (I haven’t read Emo Boy, but the concept Steve wrote on his website cracks me up: “What if this emo kid had superpowers, but they were completely destructive and he was too emo to use them anyway?” Emo Boy is currently in the works to become a movie with director Kyle Newman (Fanboys), and while Steve was working on Happyface he was also busy writing a draft of the screenplay for Emo Boy.

To learn more about Stephen Emond and Happyface visit his website. And now, let's learn a little about how and where he works. . .


Describe your workspace.

I’ve tried setting up art desks and “creative corners” but I have a tendency to turn them into piles of etcetera before long. In high school I did most of my art and writing hunched over on my bed. In my first apartment it was the couch. Now I divide my time between my computer and my couch. My art and sketchbooks are all filling up storage cabinets, I keep all my paints in a few plastic bags by the couch and the rest of my art materials are on my coffee table.



Describe a typical workday.

I make the most I can out of the few hours I can steal away for writing. I’m not a morning person in the least, so I’m at my day job until 5, I come home and eat and take care of any errands I need to catch up on. I tend to draw or work on side projects around 7 or so, anything I can do with the TV on. Usually around 9-11, the TV goes off and those are my prime writing hours. By 11:30 I stop and make my lunch, shower, and start winding down. I go to bed around 1, which may or may not be why I’m not a morning person. Weekends are a crapshoot, if I can keep a night or 2 open I can get a lot of work done, but some weekends just fill up too easily. In general I strive to keep at least one weekend night open, because I can double my productivity. And there’s so much to be done!

List three of your most favorite things in your workspace and why they are meaningful.


I do like to have candles around. I find it relaxing and somehow it just helps me concentrate.

Water, keeps me hydrated!

Comfy pajamas? I don’t know if they count as things in my workspace, but I love to be comfortable while I’m writing!
 
  
Do you have any rituals in your work habits? If so, describe them.

The music I listen to and the candles, I try to recreate an experience each time I work. So it gets to the point that I associate these things with brainstorming and writing. Once I have the iTunes playlist going and the candle is lit and the TV is off and the lighting is just right, I know it must be writing time!

What do you listen to while you work?

I listen to anything without lyrics or singing while I work. That gives me something to distract myself with, and that’s no good. I like indie movie scores, I love Jon Brion (I Heart Huckabees, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Punch-Drunk Love), jazz, I listen to Miles Davis, Dave Grusin, and The Weather Report. Vince Guaraldi. I’m working on a Christmas-themed book right now and have a lot of Christmas music playing. This will only get harder as summer rolls around. Also some video game or anime soundtracks, like Evangelion and Final Fantasy scores. Each project has an iTunes playlist, and the music I listen to is tailored to that specific project.

 
What is your drink and/or snack of choice while you’re working?

I tend to stick with water; I eat before or after writing. Food would just be another distraction for me.

What media do you use and which is your favorite?


I've only just started playing with paint, so I'm most comfortable as a cartoonist. I prefer smooth non-toothy paper, whether it's loose sheets or in a sketchbook. For finished pieces, I use Paris' "Paper for Pens" which is a sturdy bristol board-like paper that's great for holding ink. I like hard pencils; they make a nice light line that I can use as a guideline and still feel like I'm innovating a bit as I ink. I used to ink with a Winsor Newton series 7 brush, but have since found the Pentel Pocket brush to have a very similar quality with less mess, so I ink with that now. Details or any thin lines I need to make, I use a Micron for.

What aspect of illustrating do you find most challenging and why?

I suppose my biggest hurdles are finding reference for everything, which can be time consuming and difficult, and also my impatience - when I start a drawing, I rush to see the finished thing. Sometimes in my need to have it finished and done with, I let mistakes stay that are really inexcusable. Thus, most of my art pieces have at least one thing in them that causes me to cringe, which is a shame.


Do you write longhand, on a computer, or another way?

I write almost the way I draw - instead of penciling and inking, I write longhand in my sketchbooks to find all the main points I want to hit, and then I embellish and finesse as I type at my computer. I much prefer writing in my sketchbook, but I think there's a speed that my hand moves at that doesn't quite match how fast I think. So what sounds great in my head, I'll often read back and find it has a rushed quality. So it's good for me to give each chunk of writing a few passes this way.


How do you develop your story ideas? Do you use an outline, let the muse lead you, or another technique?

I'm a heavy outliner, especially since I started working with a major publisher. I work very closely with my editor, so I need to really have everything in place more or less before we bring these projects to editorial directors and acquisitions meetings. They want to know what the book definitively is before putting a lot of time and money into it. That said, you have to be free to let the story twist and turn where it will, which it inevitably does.

What keeps you focused while you’re working?

Focus is the hardest thing. Especially after working a day job all day, I pretty much want to just veg out for the evening. There are so many books I want to read and shows and movies to watch, and the internet is the worst of all. You’d think I’d know Facebook doesn’t need to be refreshed every third minute but somehow I keep refreshing it. The BEST program for the Mac is called “FREEDOM,” and it basically shuts off your Internet for whatever amount of time you specify. So I can say I do NOT want internet for the next 90 minutes, and voila. It sounds like any reasonable person could just walk away from the internet for that long but it really can be addicting, especially when you’re sitting right at your computer to write.

If you were forced to share your workspace but could share it with anyone of your choosing, who would it be?

Well, it would have to be someone productive. I’d say Stephen King in the hopes that his insane productivity would rub off on me, but I have a feeling it would be all loud rock music and crazy tapping noises like machine guns.

What is the best piece of writing/illustrating advice you’ve heard or received?

I’m a terrible person for this but I am completely blanking on great advice. My editor gives me golden advice culled straight from heaven routinely and here I am trying to think of a specific one that’s applicable to anyone and coming up dry. How I hate to let her down. BUT--to make up for it, here are two of my favorite books on writing. These are the ones I go back to routinely with each project. 1. Stephen King’s On Writing (I keep dropping his name, but it’s just a good book.) It’s very conversational, and informative, and hearing the story of his rise to fame in the writing world is very inspiring. 2. John Truby’s The Anatomy of Story. This book has really good logic on why ideas work, and how one idea can lead to another, and really helps you flesh out your stories in a way that makes good sense.

Monday, April 12, 2010

A Peek at the Creative Space of Deborah Underwood

Deborah Underwood is a talented friend of mine who I met in one of my first writing critique groups back in 2001. She is the author of 18 nonfiction titles (including Has a Cow Saved Your Life?, Staging a Play, and Northern Lights), the easy reader Pirate Mom, and co-writer with Whoopi Goldberg of the Sugar Plum Ballerina chapter book series.

And just published this spring are not one, not two, but THREE of her picture books. The first of the three is Granny Gomez & Jigsaw, published in March. I remember reading a draft of Granny Gomez’s story way back when, in our San Francisco writing group, and was so excited to see these characters again years later in their published form, wonderfully illustrated by Scott Magoon. It’s the story of a friendship between Granny Gomez and her pet pig Jigsaw. The story was inspired by Deborah’s real-life adopted pig who lived at Farm Sanctuary for many years. I really love this book--it appeals to the animal lover in me, plus it just makes me giggle. There is a great interview with Deborah at Our Hen House where she talks more about herself, this book, and the pig who inspired it.

Today is the official release day for Deborah’s second picture book titled The Quiet Book, although I spotted the book prominently displayed at the Boulder Bookstore last week. This book has already been generating a good amount of buzz and deservedly so. It received a starred review from the School Library Journal who said, “The soft, matte feel of the illustrations, created with pencil, are digitally enhanced, and are priceless. . . . A delightful and enchanting choice for storytime or sharing one-on-one.” It was also one of Amazon's picks for Best Books of the Month. It’s a beautiful book about the many different types of quiet (lollipop quiet, hide-and-seek quiet, last one to get picked up from school quiet) and the book encompasses the theme of quiet through and through. It’s a smaller than normal size picture book, with adorable little critters illustrating the different types of quiet in subdued colors (illustrations by Renata Liwska), and a gentle narration of the types of quiet throughout.

Her third picture book, A Balloon for Isabel, illustrated by Laura Rankin, will be available April 27. It was chosen as a Spring 2010 Junior Library Guild Selection (as was The Quiet Book) and is the story of Isabel, a porcupine who desperately wants a balloon and the creative solution she comes up with to get around the no-balloons-for-porcupines rule.

To find out more about Deborah Underwood, visit her website. (Author Photo Credit: John Vias)



Describe your workspace.

I live in a one-bedroom apartment, so my workspace is essentially my living room and my bedroom. I wish I had a separate office, because without one, my job seems to take over my whole life! I'll be trying to watch a DVD at night, but my gaze will drift over to a pile of work papers, and I'll end up sorting through them instead of relaxing.

Since I have a laptop, sometimes I write on my bed. I do creative work and brainstorming there, partly because I can look out my window easily and that seems to help me think. I have a resident scrub jay, Fred, that pops by for peanuts, and feeding him is a productive form of procrastination (at least according to him).

I've had some back problems, so I've rigged up a standing desk in my living room that I often use when I'm checking email or doing online research. If I have a big nonfiction project to research, I set up a card table so I can spread out my notes, or I use Standing Desk #2, a large book laid flat over my stereo. My workspace feels totally jury-rigged. I dream of getting a lovely Craftsman-style standing desk, well-made wooden file cabinets, and functional lighting someday. I kind of thought I'd have grown-up furniture by the time I hit this age. Alas!

My main work area.

Describe a typical workday.

Really, there's no such thing for me. My schedule is very dependent on what's going on--for example, the last few weeks have been almost no writing and lots of marketing and website stuff. If I have a nonfiction project due, I drop everything to work on that since my nonfiction work has tight deadlines. Generating new fiction typically falls to the bottom of the priority list, since it's speculative and no one's waiting for it. That's something I really need to rethink, because I have a middle-grade novel I'd like to write, and it's not going to happen unless I carve out fiction time almost every day.

The few semi-constants in my workdays are that I meditate every morning, and often take a break mid-day to go to the gym. I take a nap after lunch, too; just 15 or 20 minutes, but it makes a huge difference, and I really miss it when I don't get one. Afternoons are my least productive time, so working in the mornings and evenings and using the afternoons for errands and busy-work makes sense for me.

My glamourous standing desk #2. Hmm, clearly someone could use a better system for organizing papers.

List three of your most favorite things in your workspace and why they are meaningful.

1) I'll count photos of my nieces, a card from my boyfriend, and pictures of my cat who recently passed away as one item: They all remind me of those I love.

2) A box of stones: I got three stones when I went to the Highlights Chautauqua conference several years ago. Eileen Spinelli led a workshop and gave each participant a stone that her grandkids had collected. She is a lovely, warm person and the stone is a nice reminder of her and her class. And in the Chautauqua gift shop, they were selling rocks engraved with words. I bought one that said "strength," because that's what I felt I most needed at the time. Later I went to a church service there and they handed out clear red glass stones to represent faith. When I was playing with the stones, I realized that if I held the red glass stone over the word "strength," it magnified it. Faith magnifies strength--pretty cool, regardless of whether you think of faith as meaning belief in a higher power or faith in yourself.

3) An award: Pirate Mom won the Maryland Blue Crab Award for Transitional Fiction, and I got my first-ever engraved plaque! This has special significance for me because although the book got a few very good reviews, it also got a pretty bad one. And of course the bad one came at a time when I was at the end of my rope--almost out of money, feeling like there was no way I could ever make this writing career thing work, completely despondent--and it just about decimated me. Then the book went on to get picked up by Scholastic, sell over 160,000 copies, and win this award. The plaque serves as a reminder to me that one person's opinion is just one person's opinion, and that I shouldn't get too caught up in reviews (especially bad ones!).

Scrub Jay Cafe, open for business!

Do you have any rituals in your work habits? If so, describe them.

Hm. . . not really. Except that when I'm working on the first draft of a longer fiction manuscript, I make myself do 1000 words or 2 hours a day. Sometimes it's a struggle, but if I let myself slip, I'm afraid I'll never get it done. I often end up writing really fast so I can get to 1000 words quickly. The fact that I'm allowed to stop after that is good incentive! I know some authors can write for hours and hours and love losing themselves in the worlds they're creating. But for me, I'm afraid, making myself write is typically like trying to make a smart, manipulative four-year-old do something she doesn't want to do. I have to be vigilant or I'll be toast.




What do you listen to while you work?

I love music (I'm a choral singer) but unfortunately I can't listen to anything--especially anything with words--while I write fiction; it's too distracting. If I'm doing nonfiction work, sometimes I listen to Bach or other Baroque music. Oddly, I'm not all that fond of Baroque music, but I find it relaxes me without pulling me into an emotional vortex as a Romantic composer's music would.

What is your drink and/or snack of choice while you’re working?

Soy lattes are always helpful! So is dark chocolate.

What keeps you focused while you’re working?
Well, often I'm not nearly focused enough. But when I am, it's sheer willpower. And deadlines. Having an editor waiting for a revision is surprisingly motivating. :)

Do you write longhand, on a computer, or another way?

When I'm doing mostly thinking work--brainstorming, plot outlining, trying to solve problems--I scribble out notes longhand. I'm not sure exactly why this works better for me. It could be that writing longhand feels like a more direct connection to my brain. Or it could be that once something's in a word processing document, it looks official so I feel less free to play with crazy ideas. I also like the freedom to spread notes or index cards all over my bed and stare at them. But once I'm actually writing a draft, I use the computer. When I'm editing, I print out a hard copy and edit longhand, then input the changes.

How do you develop your story ideas? Do you use an outline, let the muse lead you, or another technique?

A picture book is short enough that it's not really an issue--the scribbled notes morph into the manuscript. For longer works, I generally know where I want to start and where I'll end up, and I often have a few plot points along the way I know I want to include that help anchor me a little. But I don't know exactly the path I'll take to get to the end. That seems like a good compromise: I'm not just drifting around, but there's still room to explore interesting options that may arise. Plot is challenging for me, so I'm trying to be a bit more structured about it than I have in the past. It's definitely an evolving process!

If you were forced to share your workspace but could share it with anyone of your choosing, who would it be?

Nick Park, the Wallace and Gromit creator! I got to interview him by phone for National Geographic Kids magazine, and he was incredibly nice--funny and gracious and humble and of course brilliant. I think he'd be a great office-mate. And he'd probably have all sort of clay figures lying around that I could play with.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve heard or received?

When I was at Chautauqua, I had the good fortune to work with Stephen Roxburgh. He stressed the importance of just writing through a longer work--get a first draft done, then worry about editing and messing with it. I think it's very easy to get bogged down editing and reediting chapters before you know where your book is going, and then you potentially end up having to toss out a lot of work. That advice has really helped me.

Monday, April 5, 2010

A Peek at the Creative Space of Elizabeth O. Dulemba

 Elizabeth O. Dulemba is an award-winning children's book author and/or illustrator of over a dozen books including Glitter Girl and the Crazy Cheese, The Prince’s Diary, and Paco and the Giant Chile Plant. Her most recent picture book, Soap, Soap, Soap - Jabón, Jabón, Jabón, was nominated for the Georgia Author of the Year Award. For all you parents out there with an iPhone, iTouch, or even the iPad, she also has an iBook App available for you titled Lula’s Brew. (A great thing to have stored on your device just in case you find yourself stuck somewhere with nothing to distract and entertain the little one, no?)

In addition to writing and illustrating, she is  the illustrator coordinator for the Southern SCBWI region and on the board of the Georgia Center for the Book. She also teaches "Creating Picture Books" at the John C. Campbell Folk School.

I came across Elizabeth’s blog and website a couple years ago and was immediately hooked.
Whether you’re an illustrator, writer, parent, librarian, or teacher, you'll find a wealth of information and fun activities there. Every Tuesday she posts a new coloring page on her blog, and under the links section you'll find a number of useful articles ranging from tips for building an easy website, how to host a virtual school visit, and articles on illustration methods. And that’s just a little bit of the goodies and helpful advice to be found.

In fact, she has a great blog post about redoing her office with before and after pictures. It's one of the various things I had come across that gave me the idea for doing these Creative Spaces interviews in the first place. I highly recommend checking it out. (And totally agree about her comment on having a personal color palette. I think mine might be tangerine orange, yellow, and green. Or maybe burnt orange, rusty red, and olive. Hmmm. I’ll have to give this more thought.) Another fun fact that I learned about her is that you can find her dog Bernie hidden in the illustrations of each of her books. (She has two dogs but her books started selling once Bernie made an appearance so he’s the one with the lucky mojo.)

So now let's step inside her office and find out more about Elizabeth’s workspace and process. . .

Describe your workspace.

Since I went completely digital, my workspace has streamlined quite a bit. I don't have a drawing table anymore, but  a desk with two monitors on top and a huge computer to the side. It's still a quirky, creative space though. I have big orange bookshelves, green furniture and lots of sunlight. It's my fave spot to be.


Describe a typical workday.

I'm up early, but don't claim consciousness until much later. So in the mornings I catch up on emails and trade info. That takes a few hours and lots of hot tea. I try to walk two miles with my dog at the track as often as possible, although it's been a very wet winter--yay Spring! Then I dive into whatever project is screaming loudest--whether that be writing or illustrating. When hubbie gets home, we have dinner and then I draw (with a mechanical pencil and sketchpad mostly) on the couch while we watch tv. That's actually turned out to be a great time to create my coloring pages or work on new dummies. About once a week I have lunch with friends--that keeps me sane.


 What media do you use and which is your favorite?

I live mostly in Photoshop, although my more involved style requires Painter too. I have a Wacom tablet with touch sensitive mouse pen and dual monitors. It's a pretty slick set-up.


List three of your most favorite things in your workspace and why they are meaningful.

I have a fantastic birdhouse hubbie bought for my birthday last year. And in a box, I keep a sculpture I did in kindergarten--the first real sign that I had skill. And my books--I'm surrounded by friends!

Do you have any rituals in your work habits? If so, describe them.

The hot tea thing is definitely a ritual. I buy loose tea from our local farmers market and make it in a coffee press--it's good stuff and I drink it all day.

What do you listen to while you work?

If I'm writing it has to be dead quiet to make up for being so loud inside my head! If I'm illustrating I often listen to audio books or watch hulu. It's nice when I can do both within one day--mixes things up a bit.


What is your drink and/or snack of choice while you’re working?

There's that tea thing again.

What keeps you focused while you’re working?

I have a hard time staying truly focused for more than four hours straight, so I allow myself breaks. Either a walk, a shower, even just washing my face and hands can help (especially in the summer). All of these things work wonders to get me back on track.

What aspect of illustrating do you find most challenging and why?

The blank page can be pretty daunting--especially when the vision in my head is EPIC! All I can do is start drawing and let it all slowly come together.

If you were forced to share your workspace but could share it with anyone of your choosing, who would it be?

Oh that's easy--my husband. We actually used to share a loft space. Our desks were on opposite sides of the room, but we still emailed each other. We're such geeks and get along better than any two humans have a right to.



What is the best piece of illustrating advice you’ve heard or received?

I can't say I stick to this, but the best advice is to always spend time creating things just for yourself. That's where you experiment and grow, and often how you end up with your best portfolio pieces. Don't only create for clients.


For a bonus treat, here are some illustrations from Elizabeth Dulemba's latest picture book Soap, Soap, Soap! First the sketch and then the colored version (more available on her website):